What is a Joint Managing Conservator?

Texas family law states that parents should usually be named Joint Managing Conservators. A joint conservatorship order means the parents share decision making about most issues. However, it does not mean the child’s time is split equally between the parents. A possession order states when each parent has the right to time with the child. 

In most joint conservatorship orders, one parent will have the exclusive right to decide where the child lives (usually within a certain geographic area). The parent with this right is called the “custodial parent” and the child usually lives mostly with this parent. The other parent is referred to as the “non-custodial parent.”

In some joint conservatorship orders, neither parent has the exclusive right to decide where the child lives but the child’s residence will be restricted to a certain geographic area, like a school attendance zone or county.

Texas family law states that parents should not be made Joint Managing Conservators if there is a history or pattern of violence by one parent against the other parent.